UNC’s Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology provides primary and consultative clinical care to both the inpatient and outpatient population at UNC Hospitals and affiliated practices. Our research involves broad areas of clinical epidemiology, health services research, clinical decision-making research, and prevention. We work with students, residents, and fellows in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health and UNC Hospitals to provide training ranging from introductory clinical interviewing courses to research fellowship programs for board-certified internists. We collaborate with our colleagues in the Department of Medicine and the broader UNC community and maintain strong regional, national, and international partnerships.

Gifts to the Division help us train tomorrow’s physician-scientists and make advances in health care delivery through evidence-based research.

 

 

Support the Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology

General Internal Medicine Excellence Fund
The Internal Medicine Excellence Fund provides one of the most important sources of support to the Division – gifts that are unrestricted. Gifts to this fund allow the Division to pursue its mission to advance the field of general internal medicine and serve the needs of North Carolinians through patient care, practice innovation, education, and research. In support of this mission, the Division Chief can allocate funds wherever the need is greatest and take advantage of unique opportunities as they arise.

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Contact Us

Should you have any questions or would like to discuss your support, please contact:
Beth Braxton
Director of Development, Department of Medicine
beth_braxton@med.unc.edu
919-843-8254

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