UNC Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation provides hope by restoring every patient to a life that is as full and rewarding as possible. Our mission and passion is to maximize functional abilities, minimize secondary conditions, and improve overall quality of life along the journey to recovery. Your gift expands clinical programs and research enhancing patient care and independence; supports patients in need of help with equipment costs, daily living expenses, and prescriptions; enhances educational training of our residents, the future generation of physiatrists; and trains staff in new techniques and latest advances in rehabilitation medicine.

 

Support the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation General Fund
The Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation General Fund supports access to cutting edge therapies and treatments for our faculty and residents through educational programs, meetings, and conferences. Your gift allows for innovative research critical to resident education and the advancement of patient care, and provides the latest technology and equipment.

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Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research Fund
The Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Research Fund supports continued research endeavors to maximize health and physical function for people with disabilities, including the exploration of traditional, complementary, and alternative treatment methodologies.

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Contact Us

Should you have any questions or would like to discuss your support, please contact:

Mary Margaret Carroll
Senior Executive Director of Development
mcarroll@med.unc.edu
919-843-8443

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